Reviews

Top 5 Novels for Young Adults

There is nothing better than reading a well written and educating novel. The most incredible realisation is that there is a novel out there in the world that suits everyone’s wants and desires. If you like fantasy with sci-fi elements, you have many novels to choose from. You like dystopian universes with a strong female protagonist, you’re sorted!

There is nothing better than reading a well written and educating novel. The most incredible realisation is that there is a novel out there in the world that suits everyone’s wants and desires. If you like fantasy with sci-fi elements, you have many novels to choose from. You like dystopian universes with a strong female protagonist, you’re sorted!

With this list, however, I have specifically chosen my personal top five lists of novels that I think are beneficial to young adults as they grow up.

This may be because they offer lessons about your past, help expand your mind to new possibilities and more.

Please note that this is my own personal list. Everyone has their own personal list of their favourite novels and this is my own.


The Great Gatsby

Set during the roaring 20’s, this novel will capture your heart and once it has it held, it will break it. 

This is a novel that will continue to exceed everyone’s expectations for years to come and will continue to educate about the dangers of lust.

This is my favourite novel of all time.


The Alchemist

This novel teaches us about the importance of following our hearts, that treasure may not always be of financial value and the necessity of leaving our comfort zones to educate ourselves of the outside world and the world inside of us all.

This novel can be read at any stage of our lives, but I believe it is truly important for all young adults to read this as it’ll hold value to you for decades to come.


Less than Zero

I still remember one scene in particular that made me just close the book and think about our teenage society. One of the characters becomes addicted to heroin and in order to pay the expenses for the drugs, he is forced to become a prostitute for a sick individual. 

The novel, however, centres on Clay, a rich college student returning to LA during the Winter break. While there he meets with old friends, and new and goes to drug-fueled parties whilst becoming exposed to the worst attributes of humanity. Throughout all this Clay becomes disillusioned with society and becomes alienated. The novel draws you in and especially with the way it is written, you feel the effects of the events wear on you, just as they are doing to Clay.

This novel is often regarded as the Catcher in the Rye set in the 1980’s. 


1984

Nineteen Eighty-Four, also published as 1984, follows the journey of a member of the Ruling Party, Winston Smith, in London, Oceania. The novel is a critical look at society and as the book grows older, the examination grows more and more steadily true.

The Party controls everything in Oceania, and you are watched everywhere you go (as well as heard) and frequently, people go “missing” if they are suspected of being a spy.

1984 comments on the governments’ control of society and the threat of an authoritarian rule and its impact.

A must read for all.


The Little Prince

The Little Prince or as it was originally called, Le Petit Prince, is still regarded as one of best novels of all time, selling 2 million copies annually.

The novel was written during World War 2 as the author, Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, fled to North America after the fall of France. 

Although the novel can be regarded as a children’s novel, it is much more complex than this comment. The Little Prince critiques the adult world and holds great philosophical value.

The Little Prince is often believed to be an analogy of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry life and everything that occurred within it, including his relationship with his wife and its toxicity as well as his strong belief in the nature of human spirit and courage.

This novel is timeless and holds great value.


To read more lists and reviews, please click here.

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3 comments

  1. Well thought-out and interesting post, Kyle. I’m a bookworm at heart and have heard of almost all of the above but have only read 1984 and The Great Gatsby. You have inspired me, though. I may come up with a list of my own!

    Liked by 1 person

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